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Les Petits Chefs cook the books: Jerusalem

from “Jerusalem” by Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi Turkey & Zucchini Burgers with Green Onion & Cumin

Those of you who have been reading about Les Petits Chefs for a while now (we’re celebrating three years this term!) will know that I don’t shy away from “difficult” recipes with them. Spurred on by the boys and their “can-do” attitude, I always imagine that anything is possible in the science lab twice a week with between 12 and 17 boys under the age of 13. I mean, if the boys can approach every task and recipe so positively, why shouldn’t I?  For sure it means that we are pushed for time some weeks. An hour from start to finish is not long. But we definitely achieve some pretty amazing dishes in that time. And the more we make, the more I imagine we can achieve…

So when I saw that Beth from OMG Yummy and Sarene from Fringe Food were starting an online group called Tasting Jerusalem, where interested home cooks will work through the stunning Jerusalem: A Cookbook” by Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi (Ten Speed Press), I couldn’t help but wonder whether the Petits Chefs might test a recipe or two from the book.  As Beth says in her first post, “Middle Eastern cuisine, informed by the religions, cultures and geography of the region, enjoys complex flavors that are foreign to many of our palates, which is why we have launched #TastingJrslm. The goal of this group is to become familiar with the region’s culinary personality by traveling virtually through its ingredients and flavors using the recipes in Jerusalem.”  Well now, I am all about travelling virtually through cooking and I figured the boys would probably be up for the challenge too!

January’s  theme was sumac. (Yes I know it’s February now but I didn’t get my act together in time to make this in the right month) and the recipe I chose was Turkey and Zucchini burgers with Green Onion and Cumin served with a Sour Cream and Sumac Sauce on page 200. I mean burgers (they are more like sliders) – what little boy wouldn’t want to make those?

According to Sami Tamimi, co-author of Jerusalem, sumac is a versatile spice and “can be added to so many dishes.”  But what is it?  According to Beth’s post, it’s a dried red berry with a tangy flavor and fruity undertones. Its culinary use is said to date back to ancient Roman times. Today, it’s most often found in Middle Eastern cuisine, where flecks of the ground, red berry appear in savory dishes.  Tamimi also uses it in puddings (desserts).  Sumac can be used on its own to add a bit of zip to dishes or in spice blends like za’atar, which also features thyme, sesame seeds and sometimes oregano.  I had a bit of trouble finding sumac locally (I didn’t look too far from home but I definitely know I can find it in Toronto, just not on a Sunday when I need it on a Monday!) but it’s available at Middle Eastern grocers and through many online retailers such as Penzeys Spices and Dean & DeLuca.

I ended up using Za’atar for all but one boy’s sauce – he’s allergic to sesame seeds, and I had planned to make a substitute of lemon zest rubbed with salt but we kinda ran out of time. He was happy with his sumac-less sauce (that I also tasted) – it was fine. Could have used a little more zip, though, and I will try the lemon zest/ salt combo myself at some point. Of course, now I’ll be buying the sumac too – because I have a whole lot of recipes from Jerusalem that I have bookmarked that call for it too!

The recipe was fairly easy to work through – zucchini, an egg, mint, cilantro, green onions, ground turkey, garlic, cumin and cayenne pepper all mixed up (with the boys’ hands – ewww!) to form slider-sized patties.

We seared the patties in a frying pan, then finished them off in the oven. We found them a little sloppy to work with (and if we’re really being honest here, I didn’t check that the zucchini had been squeezed out – some of them were fairly watery, so perhaps that’s the reason for the slippy mix), they didn’t really stick together until they were seared. Once they were in the oven, however, they were fine.

And whilst I cleaned up the messy, messy work stations with a couple of my older Petits Chefs, the younger guys worked with Miss Carter to make the sauce.  Basically a mix of Greek yoghurt, sour cream, lemon juice and zest with some garlic, it’s a great base dip/ sauce even without the sumac/ za’atar.

Isn’t the sumac pretty?  It definitely added some “zip” to the sauce – I’ll be using this recipe again for sure – it’s a great dip for vegetables as well as these little sliders!

And the sliders themselves? Juicy and tasty (even reheated after a subway ride home!) with a little kick from the cayenne nicely complemented by the tangy lemony sauce. I’m excited to try these again – though I think I might make meatball shaped – easier for dipping. On the other hand, a full sized burger of this recipe might be pretty darned good too.

So there you go. If 11 little boys under the age of 13 can cook from Jerusalem, so can you!

Want this recipe (and more)? Check out “Jerusalem” by Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimion Amazon or Amazon Canada. Or for free worldwide shipping, buy from The Book Depository.

And don’t forget to check in next week to see what book Les Petits Chefs cook from next….

** Tasting Jerusalem is a virtual cooking community exploring the vibrant flavors and cuisine of the Middle East through the lens of “Jerusalem: A Cookbook” by Ottolenghi and Tamimi published by Ten Speed Press. You can follow along and cook with us by subscribing to omgyummy.com, following the hashtag #TastingJrslm on Twitter and Instagram, and liking the Facebook page.

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24 Responses to Les Petits Chefs cook the books: Jerusalem

  1. Cher February 6, 2013 at 06:42 #

    Mardi – I can’t believe its been three years. And those boys are just awesome!

  2. Jan @ Family BItes February 6, 2013 at 08:23 #

    So awesome – and now you’ve inspired me to grab this book and cook some of this food for my boys at home!

  3. The Mistress of Spices February 6, 2013 at 09:04 #

    It’s so lovely and fun that you do this! Makes me wish I were one of your petits chefs :-) Are you going to join the Tasting Jerusalem group? I’m considering it as I have the book and am dying to cook from it.

    • Mardi Michels February 6, 2013 at 09:30 #

      It is such a beautiful book, right? I will join in as I can, as time permits but will follow the group with great interest!

    • Beth (OMG! Yummy) February 6, 2013 at 14:10 #

      @The Mistress of Spices – come join us – you don’t have to commit to cooking every recipe or even every month – but join the conversation and share when you can – on twitter, instagram, facebook or my blog and soon Google Plus. We’re exploring spices – come share your expertise!

  4. Beth (OMG! Yummy) February 6, 2013 at 09:22 #

    You are the best Mardi – so adventurous – those boys are SO LUCKY to have you as their culinary guide and teacher. I should have posted on Twitter about the consistency of the burgers – I had the same experience but ended up refrigerating them and cooking the next day which helped. BUT, once they cooked up, they were moist and juicy and stayed that way for a few days. So maybe that’s the compromise – a bit sticky to work with but moist turkey burgers which is no small feat. Thanks to you and les petits chefs for joining Tasting Jerusalem. We are thrilled to have you. Next up? — a little Tasting Jerusalem style Valentine’s special…

    • Mardi Michels March 2, 2013 at 19:05 #

      Thanks Beth – what a great push for me to get started using the book :)

  5. Paula February 6, 2013 at 11:15 #

    Congrats on 3 years cooking with Les Petits Chefs! Time flies when you are having fun and they certainly seem to have a lot of fun in your class Mardi. These little burgers/sliders do sound very tasty and that dip would appear to have many great uses.

  6. idiosyncratic eye February 6, 2013 at 11:24 #

    Looks yummy! I’d love that book. :)

  7. Geoff February 6, 2013 at 17:01 #

    Those of us who live down under may be a touch mystified by the term “slider”.
    What exactly is that?
    Whatever, the end result of this LPCs session appeared excellent.

  8. Viviane Bauquet Farre / Food and Style February 8, 2013 at 16:26 #

    Mardi! I love what your Petits Chefs are cooking… I bet they devoured those patties in a flash!

  9. @yumivore February 8, 2013 at 17:51 #

    Wonderful you found the sumac! Penzeys is a wonderful source, and those turkey sliders are delicious, what a great class.

    • Mardi Michels February 8, 2013 at 18:01 #

      Well not exactly sumac – za’atar… And thank you!

  10. Mary Hirsch February 9, 2013 at 15:27 #

    I just have to comment on you and “the guys” taking on “Jerusalem, A Cookbook”. After Teresa saw my Post about my making the tart from Ottolenghi’s “Plenty”, she e-mailed me about OMG Yummy’s and Sarene’s cooking his newest book (which I also have). I signed on last week and plan to join in after my move back to Colorado. I love cooking from “Plenty” also. After making the tart, I decided I had to figure out the spices I would need on a regular basis and immediately order them from Pensey’s to have on hand. You doubled down on that thought and I’ll also do that for “Jerusalem”. Pensey’s has a stand-alone store in Boulder. I think this is a wonderful way to learn about another part of the world and I also commend you for providing this experience for your little Chefs. You never take the easy road and that’s a good thing.

    • Mardi Michels March 2, 2013 at 19:04 #

      No, I sometimes wonder why I never take the easy road…. ;) But it’s rewarding!

  11. Hannah February 11, 2013 at 12:28 #

    Hi Mardi, I enjoyed reading about this cooking adventure! I am loving all the recipes from Jerusalem that I’ve made so far. These Turkey and Zucchini Burgers sound divine and I’ll be making them soon. What a perfect dish to teach the boys!

  12. A_Boleyn August 5, 2013 at 00:18 #

    Delicious looking. I have za’atar so that’s what I’ll be using instead of sumac.

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